A Ukrainian genius wants Americans to know how fortunate we are.

In 2012, a boy named Artur Samarin came to the United States from the Ukraine on a J-1 Visa, and overstayed his welcome in a most creative way. Aided and abetted by an America couple who wanted to “help” him, he changed his name, faked a birth certificate showing him to be 5 years younger than he was, and enrolled in a high school in Harrisburg, PA. In 2016, the fake “parents” turned on him, and he went to prison, not so much for impersonating an American citizen, but really for “statutory rape” for sex with a teenager. It would have been okay if he were really 17 at the time, but he was indeed 22. After prison, he was deported back to the Ukraine. I read his story today, and reading it I once again appreciated how fortunate I am to have been born in the United States.

After he was deported back to Ukraine, he had this to say of his home there. “No opportunities, no money, no areas to realize it yourself. Coal doesn’t want to be a coal if he can be a diamond.” He also had this to say about his former temporary home, the United States. “There was so much opportunity, I could have thought about conquering the moon and going to Mars. But losing that, it’s the worst horror, it’s a nightmare.” Even after being deported he couldn’t stop dreaming about the United States. His view wasn’t entirely rosy though. He had very harsh words for the media. He said being under the glare of the media” was worse than being in hell.”

Be that as it may, please note my “fellow Americans” that the proposed fence for our southern border is meant TO KEEP CERTAIN IMMIGRANTS (who try to circumvent our legal processes for admission) OUT, while there’s virtually nothing to prevent U.S. citizens from leaving. I have crossed into Canada and Mexico from the U.S., with merely a cursory checkoff–in fact, a few times that I crossed into Canada, the U.S. side had no one in the booth! Hey, you want to go, bless you. It’s a somewhat harder trying to get back in to the U.S., or for that matter, into Canada. The point is,¬†the proportional difficulty of¬†getting in vs. leaving is directly related to the desirability of living in a country.

Yah, I know about all the problems: racism, Trump, white privilege, microaggressions, Trump, family separation, Trump, wealth disparity, did I mention Trump(?) of Amerika America. But if it’s easy to leave and hard to enter, and millions are clamoring for citizenship or some semblance of it, and only a few Hillary voters and CNN reporters want out, I guess it’s better here.