The toxic twins: Virtue signaling and manufactured outrage.

I recently wrote about the Covington/Phillips incident at the confluence of the March For Life and the Indigenous People’s March.

Here is an excerpt from the Ben Shapiro show, interviewing some of the students from Covington Catholic:

Shapiro: How have your lives been changed by the media coming after you, people on the internet trying to doxx you, trying to reveal your home addresses, etc.?

Student: Yes, so the effect on our community has been great. I mean, we’re from a small town, I mean it’s been horrible. That’s what I meant. We come from like a smaller town in Kentucky so we’re not really used to like this media attention. So we’ve been getting school shooting threats, school bomb threats, vandalism of our buildings, people have gone out and said they’re going to slash our tires and break our school windows. We’ve have threats saying that it’s best if the students at CovCat are locked in the school and set on fire. We’ve had tweets saying that we should be raped by clergy members. We’ve had every sort of threat that we should be thrown in woodchippers. I mean, we’ve been several doxxing of minors.

They’ve been calling sponsors. So they put the numbers out of all of our sponsors and they’ve been calling our sponsors up. Our parents’ careers: They’ve been calling our parents’ jobs. School and personal reputation: So our school has a great reputation and in our community and abroad, and especially with colleges too. So, they’ve attacked our reputation. Colleges and careers aspirations: this is going to be kind of like a little blemish, like if we say where we’re from, they’re going to be like, “oh, you’re associated with this.” And then on us, just personally, just scared to go to school. Not many high school students have to live through the threat of saying, “It’s best if you guys are all locked in a school and set on fire.” I mean, just imagine that. This is awful. We’ve had police guards at our school and just going to school on Tuesday, a lot of us are kind of a little fearful. And just out in the community, wearing our school colors, wearing our school attire, what people are going to say to us, and how people are going to act to us.

Tucker Carlson had this to say about the MRE/”cultural elites: When the facts don’t conform to what they think they know, they ignore the facts. They see America not as a group of people or of citizens, but as a collection of groups. Some of these groups, they are convinced, are morally inferior to other groups. They know that’s true. They say it out loud. That belief shapes almost all of their perceptions of the world.

It’s not surprising, then, that when a group of pro-life Catholic kids who look like lacrosse players and live in Kentucky are accused of wrongdoing, the media don’t pause for a moment before casting judgment. Maggie Haberman of the New York Times suggested the boys needed to be expelled from school. Ana Navarro of CNN called the boys racists and “asswipes” and then went after their teachers and parents.

Others called for violence against them. CNN legal analyst Bakari Sellers suggested one of the boys should be, “punched in the face.” Former CNN contributor Reza Aslan agreed. Aslan asked on Twitter, “Have you ever seen a more punchable face than this kid’s?” Longtime CNN contributor Kathy Griffin seemed to encourage a mob to rouse up and hurt these boys, tweeting, “Name these kids. I want names. Shame them. If you think these effers wouldn’t dox you in a heartbeat. Think again.” She repeated her demand again later: “Names please. And stories from people who can identify them and vouch for their identity. Thank you.”

Hollywood film producer Jack Morrissey tweeted that he wanted the boys killed: “MAGA kids go screaming, hats first, into the woodchipper.” He paired that with a graphic photo. Actor Patton Oswalt linked to personal information about one of the boys, in case anyone wanted to get started on that project. Meanwhile, Twitter, which claims to have a policy against encouraging violence, stood by silently as all this happened.

This is toxic virtue signaling, combined with manufactured outrage, in action. I guarantee you, each of those voices quoted in the last three paragraphs would be quick to cry “hate speech” if anyone even mildly disagrees with their narrative. Then what would you call their actual words? Hate speech is too mild a term for them. Now that their narrative has been completely debunked by the full video and the ACTUAL facts, will any of them admit to being wrong? Don’t hold your breath.

Let’s let the Babylon Bee have the final word. https://babylonbee.com/news/press-that-incited-online-mob-against-teenagers-based-on-10-second-video-clip-unsure-why-some-people-call-them-fake-news


Author: iamcurmudgeon

When I began this blog, I was a 70 year old man, with a young mind and a body trying to recover from a stroke, and my purpose for this whole blog thing is to provoke thinking, to ridicule reflex reaction, and provide a legacy to my children.

One thought on “The toxic twins: Virtue signaling and manufactured outrage.”

  1. Yeah, this was well said. I read those very words from Aslan, Griffin, etc, myself. I watched the tweets go out calling for violence, coming from numerous people who should know better. This manufactured incident is so not okay and I really hope we see some lawsuits come out of it. The media, journalists, used to understand things like the dangers of libel, slander, and defamation of character.

    Like

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