When narratives lie, they are all the same.

Most narratives, defined in my previous post, are birthed by the desire to protect and justify a vested interest. That’s why most of them lie. Slaveholders protected their vested interests by distorting Bible passages and promoting theories of negro inferiority. The New York Times 1619 Project protects its vested interests —undoing Trump, endearing themselves to their anti-Trump readers and the Democrats—the same way. Distorting and rewriting our history to make it all about racism and slavery. Both narratives are lies, therefore both are the same! A lie is a lie is a lie. There are no better or worse lies. Lying is warfare. Satan is called the “father of lies.” You don’t believe in Satan? Fine. Do you believe in Jesus Christ? No? Fine…until “Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”- Philippians 2:9-11.

In the meantime, do you prefer truth to lies? If so, subject all narratives to the vested interest test. One of the most true narratives about our nation is this: To be an American is to believe that the status we are born into is never the final word. We have a spirit of striving, a spirit of hope that goes back to our very beginnings. Does this narrative offend some vested interest of yours? Can you understand that before the colonies that became the United States of America wrested their independence from the British Empire, whatever class and status you were born into was pretty much yours for generations. There was nowhere you could go to have the opportunity to remake your future and the future of your progeny–it was the same everywhere.

What could possibly be the vested interest that lies behind Rob Reiner’s unhinged Tweetstorm? On Wednesday, Reiner raged against Trump via his official twitter account: “Can’t say this enough. Donald Trump is out of his fu**ing mind. He’s moronic. He’s racist. He’s childish. He’s beyond unfit. GOP, step the f*ck up! And Dems, the house is on fire! Get out the Impeachment hoses. Stop this greedy narcissistic soulless fool or say goodbye to US.

On Tuesday, Reiner compared Trump to cancer: “To put a finer point on Trump’s claim that Google manipulated millions of votes in 2016: The President of the United States is out of his f**king mind. Can’t wait until 2020. The cancer is spreading. Televised Impeachment hearings must begin soon!

On August 20, Reiner also tried to rally Democrats against Trump’s “toxic racism”: “There is no whining. There is no complaining. There is no holding noses. We are in an epic struggle for the soul of our nation & the survival of Democracy. If we all pledge full throated support to the Democratic nominee, Trump & his toxic racism will be buried in a landslide.

Piers Morgan used to be somewhat like Reiner, and would still consider himself a proud liberal, BUT he has grown a bit beyond Reiner’s brand of “liberalism.” He says, “Populism is rising because liberals have become unbearable—and I speak as a liberal, OK?” Morgan said, adding that “liberals have become utterly, pathetically illiberal, and it’s a massive problem. What’s the point of calling yourself a liberal if you don’t allow anyone else to have a different view?”

He continued: “You know, this snowflake culture that we now operate in—the victimhood culture, the ‘everyone … has to think a certain way, behave a certain way’ … it’s all completely skewed to an environment where everyone’s offended by everything, and no one’s allowed to say a joke.”

Morgan then referred to the flap over comedian Kevin Hart backing out of hosting the Academy Awards over years-old comments some considered homophobic—and then Morgan showed how slippery the slope can get. “So hosts have gone, and soon every award winner will go because everyone’s a human, and they’re all flawed, so no one can win awards anymore because there will be no platform before they even get on the podium,” Morgan said. “So then: no hosts, no stars. Then no one can make any movies because we’re all flawed, so no actors … So suddenly, where are we?

“The liberals get what they want, which is a humorless void where nothing happens, where no one dare do anything or laugh about anything or behave in any way that doesn’t suit their rigid way of leading a life. No thanks. So what’s happening around the world? Populism is rising because people are fed up with the PC culture. They’re fed up with snowflakery. They’re fed up with people being offended by everything, and they’re gravitating toward forceful personalities who go: ‘This is all nonsense!’

“Which, by the way, it is in most cases. So why are we surprised? I’m not surprised. It doesn’t mean to say I agree with all of it, but it means I can understand it, and I understand why the liberals — my side if you like—are getting it so horribly wrong. They just wanna tell people not just how to lead their lives, but ‘if you don’t lead it the way I tell you to’—it’s a kind of version of fascism. ‘If you don’t lead the life the way I’m telling you to, then I’m going to ruin your life. I’m gonna scream abuse at you. I’m gonna get you fired from your job. I’m gonna get you hounded by your family and friends. I’m gonna make you the most disgusting human being in the world.'” Could he be talking about Reiner?

Isaac Bashevis Singer: “When a day passes it is no longer there. What remains of it? Nothing more than a story. If stories weren’t told or books weren’t written, man would live like the beasts, only for the day. The whole world, all human life is one long story.” John Dos Passos, from a 1941 essay, “The Use of the Past.” It is uncannily relevant to the present: “In times of change and danger when there is a quicksand of fear under men’s reasoning, a sense of continuity with generations gone before can stretch like a lifeline across the scary present and get us past that idiot delusion of the exceptional Now that blocks good thinking. That is why, in times like ours, when old institutions are caving in and being replaced by new institutions not necessarily in accord with most men’s preconceived hopes, political thought has to look backwards as well as forwards.

William McClay speech: “How, we wonder today, could such otherwise enlightened and exemplary men as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson have owned slaves, a practice so contradictory to all they stood for? There is no easy answer to such questions. But surely a part of the answer is that each of us is born into a world that we did not make, and it is only with the greatest effort, and often at very great cost, that we are ever able to change that world for the better. Moral sensibilities are not static; they develop and deepen over time, and general moral progress is very slow. The ambivalences regarding slavery built into the structure of the Constitution were almost certainly unavoidable in the short term, in order to achieve an effective political union of the nation. What we need to understand is how the original compromise no longer became acceptable to increasing numbers of Americans, especially in one part of the Union, and why slavery, a ubiquitous institution in human history, came to be seen not merely as an unfortunate evil but as a sinful impediment to human progress, a stain upon a whole nation. We live today on the other side of a great transformation in moral sensibility, a transformation that was taking place but was not yet completed in the very years the United States was being formed.How, we wonder today, could such otherwise enlightened and exemplary men as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson have owned slaves, a practice so contradictory to all they stood for? There is no easy answer to such questions. But surely a part of the answer is that each of us is born into a world that we did not make, and it is only with the greatest effort, and often at very great cost, that we are ever able to change that world for the better. Moral sensibilities are not static; they develop and deepen over time, and general moral progress is very slow.”


Author: iamcurmudgeon

When I began this blog, I was a 70 year old man, with a young mind and a body trying to recover from a stroke, and my purpose for this whole blog thing is to provoke thinking, to ridicule reflex reaction, and provide a legacy to my children.

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